Spain rises in think tank fragility rankings

‘MORE FRAGILE’: The FFP said the ongoing situation in Cataluña had influenced Spain’s place in the rankings ‘MORE FRAGILE’: The FFP said the ongoing situation in Cataluña had influenced Spain’s place in the rankings

SPAIN has come 149th out of 178 countries in a think tank’s rankings of the world’s most fragile states.

The country’s place in the table has risen from 155th place in 2017. The rankings, from the Fund for Peace (FFP) group, lists countries by the risks they face in remaining united, functioning countries.

The higher a country places on the table, the more fragile they are deemed to be, according to the body.

The think tank uses software to gather data from thousands of media sources, as well as from statistics organisations. The FFP also has a team which looks at key events in each country to determine their place in the table.

Spain remained in the ‘stable’ category despite its movement upward in the rankings. The four classifications ranged from ‘sustainable’, ‘stable’, ‘warning’ and ‘alert’.

South Sudan ranked highest, falling into the alert category according to the report.

The FFP said the Catalan independence referendum held in October last year had marked the beginning of a political, social and constitutional crisis for Spain.

“The situation spiralled into chaos as the Spanish government first declared the referendum illegal while the separatist regional administration in Barcelona moved forward with the process anyway.”

“The Spanish government’s extreme reaction to the October referendum served only to escalate the situation,” the group said.

The think tank added the results of December’s snap election, which was called by the Spanish government after it suspended Cataluña’s regional government, had “solidified” pro-independence feelings there.

“The severe response of the central government to Cataluña’s move toward independence only served to further solidify negative sentiments towards the central government in Madrid.”

“December’s parliamentary election saw the greatest success of pro-independence parties in their history,” the FFP said.

Joe Gerrard

Share your story with us by emailing newsdesk@euroweeklynews.com, by calling +34 951 38 61 61 or by messaging our Facebook page.

Comments (1)

  1. Naimah Yianni

"The FFP said the Catalan independence referendum held in October last year had marked the beginning of a political, social and constitutional crisis for Spain.".... How can people trying to achieve self determination be a constitutional crisis? ...

"The FFP said the Catalan independence referendum held in October last year had marked the beginning of a political, social and constitutional crisis for Spain.".... How can people trying to achieve self determination be a constitutional crisis? If they are NOT allowed self determination, surely THAT is a constitutional crisis. This country has really never developed beyond a dictatorship and it´s getting worse, but then so is most of the world. people need to wake up and start fighting back for liberty before we lose it altogether, everywhere

Read More
 
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

Posting comment as a guest.
0 Characters
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location

Poll of the Week

Do you think it’s important to speak Spanish, living or holidaying in Spain?

New online edition graphic


© 2018 EWN Media Group, Avenida Ramon y Cajal 54, Edificio River Playa, Local 2, 29640 Fuengirola, Malaga, Spain. Telephone: +34 951 38 61 61. No part of this website may be reproduced without written permission from the publishers. All rights reserved. Todos los derechos reservados. 
Privacy Policy - Legal Notice - Cookies